Posts in Category: Painting

Painting the Fjord at Tahuya

Tahuya • 24" x 36"

Tahuya • 24″ x 36″

This is a painting of Tahuya, a spot in Washington that has a genuine inland fjord. Fjords: not all in Norway!

My sister Tiffany has a neat little place right on the water and this is a painting from a photo she took just outside. Since it’s a fjord that connects to the ocean, it’s saltwater and there are bunches of oysters, clams, and mussels. The water’s edge is littered with the shells which get bleached by the sun over time and can be seen in the shallows.

There were a couple of surprising color behaviors while I painted this. I can’t recall this happening with other paintings, but the gel that I use as an isolation coat between layers added a slightly purple sheen in some light, at some angles. That made it tricky to see my progress. Check out this video below to see how it looked mid-painting from one angle to another.

The other color trickery emerged when I got a scan of the finished painting. All of the dark areas are primarily a combination of ultramarine blue and burnt umber. The ultramarine blue in particular made the ripples look pretty dark – correct to my eye when I see it in person. The scan lost a lot of the nuance, though, and it took a half dozen adjustment layers & masks to get the image resembling the real thing. The scans usually don’t need much (if any) adjustment, and I’m not quite sure what it is about this one that made it different (technique? dynamic range?).


Almost forgot to take a pic of the sketch

Sketch

Yellow ochre, painted outside in downtown Campbell

Yellow ochre

Midtones, painted back at home

Burnt sienna

Getting more range with burnt umber

Burnt umber

At some point after the first round of blues

Some blues

Mostly shot this to figure out how it was looking

In progress

Zelda-style helmet repaint

Finished helmet (with gloss sealant)

Finished helmet (with gloss sealant)

I don’t usually paint on 3D objects…but when I do it’s usually for a gift. This is a Zelda-themed repaint for my friend Jeremy who has a whole black/white/red setup for his motorcycle & gear. The helmet was pure white with black accents, so I took a few photos and went through a couple of rounds of mockups to figure out the look.

Visualizing on a curved surface is tricky! I considered taking some reference photos and mapping them onto a 3D object so I could spin it around, but (as I often do) opted for the quicker visualization figuring that I’d work out the fine details as I went. These Photoshop mockups just overlay vector masks onto the photo, and I eyeballed the curvature to fit the viewing angle.

Photoshop Test #1 was about establishing the overall placement for the classic Hyrulian crest with a little decoration on the sides. Jeremy wanted to incorporate “It’s dangerous to go alone” on it so he found the phrase in a glyph system designed for the latest game, Breath of the Wild. He also wanted more black along the sides and front, so for Photoshop Test #2 I figured out how to extend it without interfering with the letters (or vents).

Once I was ready to start painting, I knew I wouldn’t be able to mask the fine detail for the glyphs. Instead, I measured the front and printed them out to fit that length. Since it’s a curved surface, I also needed to work out how they would wrap evenly. To get this look, I cut vertical lines between each glyph so I could carefully bend the paper. I taped it over the area to paint them to use as a visual guide, and that worked out pretty well.

The rest I’d masked carefully though I ended up doing a lot of cleanup on the edges. Since I painted it (rather than spraying it) the paint didn’t leave a clean edge on the first pass. I wasn’t ready to invest in the kind of system (and masking, and ventilation) I’d need to do a proper spray, so it’s a good thing this worked! I used Testor’s Paint which seemed to grip pretty well. A final gloss coat by a professional painter helped seal it in. Ready to go!

Test #1: logo placement

PS Test #1: logo

Test #2: incorporating text and more black

PS Test #2: more black

Hand painting the glyphs

Hand painting the glyphs

Masking around the vents

Masking around the vents

Finished product (side)

Finished product (side)

Finished product (back)

Finished product (back)

Roots series

Roots: Carrot • 8"x10" (in frame)

Roots: Carrot • 8″x10″ (in frame)

Happy May Day! In celebration of the warmer weather and the end of the drought, I created this series of things that grow in the ground. I always like cutaway-style illustrations so I created a view of what’s above and below the ground.

I’d found these chicken wire frames last year. I really liked the style except for one part: they had black velvet swing arms so they could be free-standing. The arms really distracted from the chicken wire, so I removed them and employed them in a little creative use last year.

As for the rest of it..? No deep meaning here, just an excuse to study the details and spend some time with watercolors.

Starting sketch

Starting sketch

First layer of blues

First layer of blues

In progress

In progress

Roots: Carrot

Roots: Carrot

Roots: Garlic

Roots: Garlic

Roots: Ginger

Roots: Ginger

Roots: Lettuce

Roots: Lettuce

Roots: Onion

Roots: Onion

Roots: Potato

Roots: Potato

Roots: Radish

Roots: Radish

Live Painting for Cinequest 2017: Elevate

Elevate: Day 13

Elevate: Day 13

During the Cinequest Film & VR Festival, I’m one of three “live painting” artists for Phantom Galleries along with Brandon Anderton and Fernando Amaro Jr. (Force129). We each started a painting that we’ll complete over the course of the Cinequest Festival, to be completed on the final day at the closing party.

When I thought of the theme, “Elevate”, I thought about how people express themselves with gestures. I picked a movie for each of the 13 days of Cinequest to be represented here by gestures from one of their characters. I’ll update this daily with the current progress as well as information about which movies are represented. By March 12th, this will contain them all. Enjoy!

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Elevate legend of movies

Elevate legend of movies

Bel Bacio Featured Artist for February

What you see when you walk into Bel Bacio this month

What you see when you walk into Bel Bacio this month

I just finished hanging a dozen pieces of art at Bel Bacio coffee shop in San Jose’s Little Italy. There’s an entrance wall and a front room with three walls (and a window), so I chose a mix of paintings, illustration, and prints for each of the four walls. I matched nearby colors wherever possible and grouped them together in four themes:


The "pleasant outing" wall

The “pleasant outing” wall

The "working man" wall

The “working man” wall

The "focus on photography" wall

The “focus on photography” wall

Re-paint: The Rooster’s Crown

The Rooster's Crown • 12.5" x 29"

The Rooster’s Crown • 12.5″ x 29″

This is the last of 6 calendars I’ve re-painted with Chinese folktales in time for the Lunar New Year 2017. While it’s the Year of the Rooster, I’ve heard that the Chinese calendar alternates masculine and feminine years so it is more accurately the Year of the Hen. A fire hen, at that!

This calendar’s story is about how the rooster got his crown. In the early days of the earth, there were nine suns which scorched the plants and cause people to live in caves. A famous archer, Yi, shoots down eight of the suns using a pond’s reflection. The ninth sun goes into hiding, casting the land into darkness. The rooster is the only one who can coax it to come back out, and for that, he is granted his crown (comb).

Like the sheep calendar, this one has oversize flowers too. There’s also a little lazy duplication in the green plants by the chicks where the same art is copied and resized slightly. I also ended up painting out extraneous plants along the top and side edges to balance out the composition better.

Original calendar

Original calendar

Background colored

Background colored

Water added, branch removed

Water added, branch removed

Re-paint: The Farmer’s Fence

The Farmer's Fence • 12.5" x 30"

The Farmer’s Fence • 12.5″ x 30″

This calendar re-paint is about a story of a farmer who loses a sheep because a wolf snuck through a broken part of a fence. His neighbors tell him he should fix the fence, but he is too focused on the loss of the sheep. The next night, the wolf returns and he loses more sheep. It is a cautionary tale about not dwelling on the past.

This calendar features an odd visual quirk I noticed on some of them – the sense of proportion gets really odd with the foliage. The flowers in the midground are massive. I imagine the calendar designs are just combining pieces of illustrations. On the Rooster calendar, it’s pretty clear these are different illustrations combined together.

I opted to paint similar flowers at a more accurate scale by the resting sheep. That area originally had italicized text in a similar color scheme that read “Good Luck!”

In each of the calendars I’ve chosen one element to outline, and here I opted to keep the fence relatively flat and cartoon-like. I added more subtle detail in the grass by using brown to indicate the (now treadworn) path through the broken fence.

Original calendar

Original calendar

Good Luck!

Good Luck!

Background filled in

Background filled in

Re-paint: The Monkey’s Loss

The Monkey's Loss • 12.5" x 30"

The Monkey’s Loss • 12.5″ x 30″

This calendar re-paint reflects a Chinese folktale about a little monkey who came down from the mountain. It took a little while to find a folktale about monkeys that was not about the Monkey King, a story too big to illustrate here and usually depicting the Monkey King with a more human-like body (plus clothing).

The monkey, coming down from the mountain, is excited to find peaches and gathers them. Further down, he finds corn and abandons the peaches for that. Continuing on, the corn is left behind in favor of a watermelon. Then a rabbit rushes by, and he drops the watermelon to pursue it. After a chase, the rabbit is lost and the monkey ends up with nothing.

The illustration on this calendar is the most abstract one of the calendars I found in how it uses blotches of colors for the monkeys, rocks, and leaves. The monkeys were originally so blotchy that I filled in all of their white areas with yellow ochre so they’d stand out from the rock and sky. Still: did you notice there are three? I didn’t at first.

On a few of these repaints I’ve ended up painting out additional foliage from the edges because it was too distracting. I left the sky pretty simple since the rock and plants have a lot of texture.

Original calendar

Original calendar

Sides painted

Sides painted

Before adding details

Before adding details

Chinese Folktales on Repainted Calendars

Chinese Folktales (all 6 calendar repaints)

Chinese Folktales (all 6 calendar repaints)

Scrolls are easy to transport

Scrolls are easy to transport

For the new year I’ve finished a small set of art I started originally back in 2009. Each of these started off as a giveaway calendar from a Chinese restaurant. I’ve been collecting these and “repainting” them by painting over everything except the main image. I attempted to match both the colors and the painting style of the printed art as best I could to preserve the original look as much as possible.

Based on the animal (or fish) on each one, I chose a related Chinese folktale or mythology to illustrate. I also chose one element to outline to make it stand out. I watched a lot of cartoons growing up and always found the juxtaposition of a painted background with a flat, outlined animation cel set a particular tone about what merited attention.

Here they are in the window display at Kaleid Gallery, from left to right:

The Dragon God
Dragons are symbols of power, strength, and good luck, and have particular control over water.

The Monkey’s Loss
The monkeys abandoned peaches for corn, and then watermelons, and then lost it all in pursuit of a rabbit.

The Farmer’s Fence
The farmer, mourning the loss of a sheep after the fence broke, fails to mend it and later loses more.

The Rabbit In the Moon
The rabbit is a companion of the moon goddess Chang’e, and uses a mortar and pestle to pound the elixir of life.

Ye Xian (the “Chinese Cinderella”)
Ye Xian, a peasant girl, befriends a magical carp who helps her win the hand of the prince.

The Rooster’s Crown
After a skilled archer shot the eight suns, the ninth hid away until the rooster could coax it out.

Tumultuous

Tumultuous • 5" x 5"

Tumultuous • 5″ x 5″

I’ve been meaning to do more with watercolor pencils to get a better grasp of how to work with them. I recently used them for the Creepy Ancestors series, and decided to give them another try for this ocean illustration.

Water is very challenging! Some art locks onto the heart of the subject right away, but this stayed pretty elusive. There are sharp contrasts and defined edges, but they’re fleeting. The spray can be settled like a light wash or frothing along the tops of waves. I broke out my masking fluid to preserve the white parts, but it just didn’t give the depth I wanted so I resorted to a few spots of white acrylic at the end. I used three shades of blue, a green, and a touch of Payne’s Gray (watercolor from tubes, not the pencils) too.

I noticed that the watercolor pencils are a little finicky about how to set the color. If I draw with them first and then add water, it lifts up the pigments and dilutes it pretty thoroughly. If I draw on top of wet paper, sometimes it seems to make no mark and other times it drops a strong piece of color. I found the most consistent results in dipping the pencil itself into water and then drawing/painting with that, using extra water to dilute or soften as needed. Sometimes I’d let it all dry and then use the watercolor pencils more like colored pencils so I could get some hard lines. They’re great for traveling – much more convenient than watercolor tubes – so they will definitely get more use.