Prior Art: Mixing

Technology: Mixing

Technology: Mixing

Mixing is the last of seven technologies I’ve explored in Prior Art: analog media manipulation and vintage virtual reality.

Steve Plans the Transition • 18" x 24" • acrylic on canvas

Steve Plans the Transition • 18″ x 24″

Steve Plans the Transition

Steve Johnson // SoundCloud: @ByDisgn

“Two turntables and a microphone” are the classic setup for a live DJ. During songs, the DJ will gauge the mood of the crowd and queue up potential next songs. Albums provide a richness in sound quality but also unique ways to blend songs together through scratching and beat matching.

In addition to commercially-available albums, DJs may use white label albums: limited runs of songs often used for house music and hip hop. Sometimes these albums are made to test crowd response for tracks that aren’t yet released to buy or missing the proper clearance for samples.

In the early days of hip hop and freestyle improvisation, most performances only occurred live (instead of in a studio). Between performances, mixtapes (or party tapes) provided a way to spread their music through clubs and parties. DJs and club proprietors often record their own to sell to promote their work.

Mixtape Confessional • 8" x 10" • colored pencil and ink on paper

Mixtape Confessional • 8″ x 10″

Mixtape Confessional

The greater availability of cassettes and high-quality home recording equipment put music recording within reach for consumers who could create their own mixes from the radio, other tapes, or albums. Private mixtapes are forms of personal expression, created to capture a particular time or mood and intended for a specific audience.

Handwriting the song list on the paper insert for the cassette was often just as important as picking the songs themselves.

Mix It Up • 7" x 5" • colored pencil on paper

Mix It Up • 7″ x 5″

Mix It Up

The unifying thread of a good mixtape can be almost anything.

It can be familiar to many with popular songs or to a few with indie selections. It can be obscure to challenge the listener or local for surprising references.
It can have a steady flow or choose to change it. It might ramp up, it might ramp down, or it might fluctuate.
It can set a mood: red up, victorious, irty, cheery, introspective, calm.
It can fit a particular spot: the energy of a dance or the chill of a club, the excitement of a race or the reflection of a dive bar, the relaxation of a beach or the quiet of a bookstore.

Whatever it is, it captures a time, place, and mood for the person listening to it.

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