Search Results for: object

Sketches: Object Oriented wraps up

A brief update: here are the rest of the sketches from my little Object Oriented sketchbook (the rest are here, here, and here). I’ve got another sketchbook going now that’s a different take on objects, so I’ll catch up to that soon.

Greeting card display

Greeting card display

Eerie skull stool

Eerie skull stool

Touch of upholstery

Touch of upholstery

Nearly empty

Nearly empty

Metallic cream

Metallic cream

Tea basket

Tea basket

Little stone bowl

Little stone bowl

Wooden & sturdy

Wooden & sturdy

Dangling spotlight

Dangling spotlight

Comments?

Comments?

Vending

Vending

Cleaning up

Cleaning up

Sketches: Object Oriented continued

I’m about three-quarters of the way through my Object Oriented sketchbook–the earlier sketches are here and here. My pen began to run dry, so I switched to a new one partway through this batch. In hindsight, I should have kept the original pen for shading, as it’s been challenging to do detail work with the ink-laden new pen.

Cozy fancy chair

Bagel offering

Wall of sound

This way

Splayed flight tags

Shiny & crinkly

Empty newsstand

Tea at Satori

A bit of hydration

Neatly collapsed

Where’s the bulb?

Hello Good Pie!

Sketches: Object Oriented returns

The second batch of sketches! It’s been a few months, and I have fourteen more Object Oriented sketches to show for it. When I originally started I promised to post more when I got halfway through, but apparently I went a few beyond that. Carrying this little book and pen with me everywhere has been working in the sketch-more-often department. Enjoy!

Barefoot Coffee

Feel welcomed?

Ready for snowballs

Cheep!

Clever napkin wrap

Keeping SJ lit

Humble popcorn

Waiting at The Garage

Don’t slip!

Ridiculously tasty

“Crusin'”

Hawaiian tchotcke

Kona Brewing Co.

Beach day

Sketches: Object Oriented

Object Oriented, the book

Object Oriented, the book

I have a weakness for sketchbooks, and often buy neat-looking ones in the hope that they’ll be a good motivation to draw more. I found these funky little 3″ x 3″ leather-bound books at Cost Plus World Market a little over a year ago, and decided it’d be just the right size to carry around. While it’s just a cheap little notebook, I really like the size and feel of it, and wanted to make it into a worthy standalone art piece on its own. I’ve diligently stuck to the same theme and the same marker, a sienna brush pen, to keep the look consistent even though it may be months between sketches.

Why Object Oriented? Objects, as subjects, are easy. They don’t move (usually). They don’t get self-conscious. The textures are challenging…especially the smooth, manufactured ones. It makes me look around my environment more. And it’s a term drilled into me from my computer science days, a concept I still like. I’m a quarter of the way through the book; I’ll post more sketches when I make it halfway.

Puzzle pieces

Puzzle pieces

Tape measuring

Tape measuring

Teeny espresso cup

Teeny espresso cup

Modern chair at the airport coffee shop

Modern chair

Stained glass light

Stained glass light

Clock countdown

Clock countdown

Winding line of chairs

Winding line of chairs

Part of airplane seatbelt

Part of airplane seatbelt

Plastic coffee lid

Plastic coffee lid

Empty gumbo bowl

Empty gumbo bowl

Corduroy hat

Corduroy hat

Zelda-style helmet repaint

Finished helmet (with gloss sealant)

Finished helmet (with gloss sealant)

I don’t usually paint on 3D objects…but when I do it’s usually for a gift. This is a Zelda-themed repaint for my friend Jeremy who has a whole black/white/red setup for his motorcycle & gear. The helmet was pure white with black accents, so I took a few photos and went through a couple of rounds of mockups to figure out the look.

Visualizing on a curved surface is tricky! I considered taking some reference photos and mapping them onto a 3D object so I could spin it around, but (as I often do) opted for the quicker visualization figuring that I’d work out the fine details as I went. These Photoshop mockups just overlay vector masks onto the photo, and I eyeballed the curvature to fit the viewing angle.

Photoshop Test #1 was about establishing the overall placement for the classic Hyrulian crest with a little decoration on the sides. Jeremy wanted to incorporate “It’s dangerous to go alone” on it so he found the phrase in a glyph system designed for the latest game, Breath of the Wild. He also wanted more black along the sides and front, so for Photoshop Test #2 I figured out how to extend it without interfering with the letters (or vents).

Once I was ready to start painting, I knew I wouldn’t be able to mask the fine detail for the glyphs. Instead, I measured the front and printed them out to fit that length. Since it’s a curved surface, I also needed to work out how they would wrap evenly. To get this look, I cut vertical lines between each glyph so I could carefully bend the paper. I taped it over the area to paint them to use as a visual guide, and that worked out pretty well.

The rest I’d masked carefully though I ended up doing a lot of cleanup on the edges. Since I painted it (rather than spraying it) the paint didn’t leave a clean edge on the first pass. I wasn’t ready to invest in the kind of system (and masking, and ventilation) I’d need to do a proper spray, so it’s a good thing this worked! I used Testor’s Paint which seemed to grip pretty well. A final gloss coat by a professional painter helped seal it in. Ready to go!

Test #1: logo placement

PS Test #1: logo

Test #2: incorporating text and more black

PS Test #2: more black

Hand painting the glyphs

Hand painting the glyphs

Masking around the vents

Masking around the vents

Finished product (side)

Finished product (side)

Finished product (back)

Finished product (back)

Prior Art: Darkroom

Technology: Darkroom

Technology: Darkroom

Darkrooms are the fourth of seven technologies I’ve explored in Prior Art: analog media manipulation and vintage virtual reality.

Jillian Adjusts the Tone • 24" x 18" • acrylic on canvas

Jillian Adjusts the Tone • 24″ x 18″

Jillian Adjusts the Tone

As a digital photographer, the world of film has always been cloaked with the mystery of alchemy and magic. Exploring a working film lab was fascinating, and Lynde was so generous in explaining different aspects of development – the process is much more rich and complex than I had imagined.
Jillian Cocklin // epoxystudios.com

The darkroom is a workshop to allow photographers to develop film and make prints. Since film development relies on careful control of light, a safelight is the only lighting used for illumination. Many black-and-white papers are sensitive primarily to blue or blue-green light, so a red or amber- colored light will keep the paper from accidental exposure. A variety of chemicals are used to develop and set the film, usually in conjunction with a trough-style sink and plastic trays. An enlarger, which looks somewhat like a vertically-mounted camera, is used create prints by projecting light through a piece of film onto exposure-sensitive paper for a precise amount of time.

Correct exposure depends on the content of the photo as well as the sensitivity of the paper. To get the right tone, photographers will take a test strip of paper and progressively expose portions of it for set durations of time. That way, they can evaluate a range of results to identify the right exposure time to use for that particular photo and paper.

Yin & Yang / Dodge & Burn • 10" x 8" • charcoal on paper

Yin & Yang / Dodge & Burn • 10″ x 8″

Yin & Yang / Dodge & Burn

The amount of time a photo is exposed to light before it is “set” determines how light or dark it will be. Photographers can selectively expose or mask areas of photos to create particular effects.

“Dodging” involves using a cutout shape on the end of a thin stick to prevent portions of a photo from being exposed to light. Since exposure to light makes a photo darker, those protected portions remain lighter. “Burning” creates the opposite effect: using a mask or hole for light to pass through to create extra exposure to light (and therefore darker results). A quick way to do this is with one’s hand, but it can also be done with any object that can selectively expose light.

Shirley Card Distortion • 7" x 5" • colored pencil on paper

Shirley Card Distortion • 7″ x 5″

Shirley Card Distortion

To create consistent results, film producers created a reference photo to represent an ideal range of colors and tones. In addition to showing basic colors and a grayscale range, these also included a person for reference. One early model was a Kodak employee named Shirley, so they became known as “Shirley cards”.

However, each reference only included one model that was always a caucasian female. This resulted in chemical calibrations that had very little nuance in brown tones, so all other skin tones turned out off-balance with distorted colors and often too dark to capture detail. Amazingly, film producers didn’t start including a wider range of brown tones until they received complaints from furniture and chocolate manufacturers that they couldn’t differentiate their range of products in photos. Later reference cards were updated to include multiple multiracial models.

Sketches: More Undefined Variables

Just scanned a bunch of the sketches from the little notebook I carry with me (theme: Undefined Variables). Much like my first notebook (Object Oriented) I started running out of ink at about the 3/4 mark, right near the end of these. I remembered that a drying-out brush pen is still pretty useful for shading, so now I’m carrying both it and a fresh one.

Stovetop

Stovetop

Potted plant

Potted plant

San Jose Airport

San Jose Airport

Rogue Brewing Co.

Rogue Brewing Co.

Fountain

Fountain

Monitor

Monitor

En route

En route

Singlebarrel

Singlebarrel

Dancing Cat Cafe

Dancing Cat Cafe

Kitchen table

Kitchen table

Tahuya

Tahuya

Fog City Diner

Fog City Diner

Over the Shoulder

Over the Shoulder

Over the Shoulder • 30″ x 20″ • 2015

This one’s another commission from my friend Kevin. Merry Christmas Allie!

I worked from an Instagram photo of her two cats before a windowsill. The layout was the first challenge. Since the original photo was square, I mocked up a few options in landscapes and portrait orientations. This landscape option gave it a little more room to breathe, and is closer to what an observer would see. I made some small adjustments to the composition to remove a few ambiguous objects (between the cats, and on the far right), add a little more separation between the cats for a better silhouette, and scooted the vase over a bit.

The second challenge was getting an accurate sketch of the perspective. Between the windowsills and the blinds, I spent a little extra time on the sketch to be sure I got it right. This painting is a bit larger than I usually work so I used my massive T-square (3 feet long) to make the sketch. It’s so big I often only use it for mat cutting…or retrieving things that have rolled away under furniture. Nice to use it for its intended purpose!

Since the lighting is so bright, I used a few additional reference photos of the cats to get the colors right. They have a light tan undercoat with grayish stripes. The stippling texture I’ll often use in details worked out well here for their coloration. One of the most interesting parts to paint was the tabletop due to the window and vase reflections. I also enjoyed painting the cats, and in particular getting the ear positions right. They’re definitely listening here.

Original photo

Original photo

Initial sketch

Initial sketch

Yellow ochre

Yellow ochre

Burnt sienna

Burnt sienna

Burnt umber

Burnt umber

Adding blues

Adding blues

Green wash

Green wash

Adding reds

Adding reds

Blinds details

Blinds details

Cat lighting detail

Cat lighting detail

Blue cast

Blue cast

Illustration

Decorative

Cat's In the Cradle series • 3 paintings

Cat’s In the Cradle series • 3 paintings

Roots series

Roots • 7 illustrations

Chinese Folktale Calendar Re-Paints • 6 paintings

Chinese Folktale Calendar Re-Paints • 6 paintings

Peace, Love, and Understanding series

Peace, Love, and Understanding • 4 illustrations

Creepy Ancestors

Creepy Ancestors • 3.2″x4.2″

Bathers series

Bathers • 8 illustrations

Belva Lockwood

Belva Lockwood (Language of Flowers) • 2016

Edith O'Gorman

Edith O’ Gorman (Language of Flowers) • 2015

Little Creatures of Love

Little Creatures of Love • 2016, 6″ x 6″

At the Paris Exhibition, 1900

At the Paris Exhibition, 1900 • 14.25″ x 17.25″

Bathers series

Waiting & Watching • 2015, 11″ x 9″

Trilogy of Munchies series

Trilogy of Munchies • 3 illustrations

Musicians

Musicians • 11 portraits

Series 1: Craft

Series 1: Craft • 11 vinyl toys

Characters

Customer Journey Map

Customer Journey Map • 2016

Inktober '14: George

Inktober ’14: George • 7 sketches

Inktober '14: Maddie

Inktober ’14: Maddie • 6 sketches

Inktober '14: Michael

Inktober ’14: Michael • 6 sketches

Inktober '14: Roshan

Inktober ’14: Roshan • 7 sketches

Sketches

Bathers series

Rebus Time

Steampunk Katherine

Steampunk • 7 sketches

Aquarium Gaze sketch

Aquarium Gaze sketch

Sea creature

Sea creature

Baa Baa Black Sheep

Baa Baa Black Sheep

Life drawing sketches

Life drawing • 6 sketches

In a Houdini mood

In a Houdini mood

PS3 Controller pointilism

PS3 Controller pointilism

Smoker sketch

Smoker sketch

V for Vendetta

V for Vendetta

Sketchbooks

Japantown SJ

Japantown SJ

Undefined Variables pt.4

Undefined Variables pt.4 • 12 sketches

Undefined Variables pt.3

Undefined Variables pt.3 • 12 sketches

Undefined Variables pt.2

Undefined Variables pt.2 • 10 sketches

Undefined Variables pt.1

Undefined Variables pt.1 • 13 sketches

Object Oriented pt.4

Object Oriented pt.1 • 11 sketches

Object Oriented pt.2

Object Oriented pt.2 • 14 sketches

Object Oriented pt.3

Object Oriented pt.3 • 12 sketches

Object Oriented pt.4

Object Oriented pt.4 • 12 sketches

Inktober week 4: George

Inktober is done, and here’s the last batch of sketches: this time it’s George, age 76. Some of these expressions are very suitable for Halloween! [also see previous Inktober sketches ]

It’s been a fun exercise, though I like having these as pick-up projects rather than forcing a daily schedule. I’ll keep doing this and posting batches as they are ready. It’ll be a good project to have on hand if I’m more in the mood to draw people rather than my current object-sketching project, Undefined Variables.

Yeah, I'm not that thrilled with the straight-ahead shots either

Waiting

Amused, in that slightly self-conscious way

Amused

I imagine him reacting to hearing someone else telling a story here

Cringing

The word that comes to mind here is "egad!"

Aghast

A bit unsure, but thinking it over

Contemplative

Boo!

Startled

I'd be wincing too if someone drew my head this funny. Sorry about that

Wincing