Posts Tagged: decorative

Linocut: SJ Electric Light Tower

SJ Electric Light Tower

SJ Electric Light Tower

These are linocut prints of the San José Electric Light Tower, a tower that spanned an intersection and provided the first electric lighting west of the Rockies. I carved this into a flexible linoleum block, which I inked by hand and “printed” by pressing it onto paper. Since they/re done one at a time there can be a lot of variation, as shown. Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, and enjoy a little illumination for this winter.

Tumultuous

Tumultuous • 5" x 5"

Tumultuous • 5″ x 5″

I’ve been meaning to do more with watercolor pencils to get a better grasp of how to work with them. I recently used them for the Creepy Ancestors series, and decided to give them another try for this ocean illustration.

Water is very challenging! Some art locks onto the heart of the subject right away, but this stayed pretty elusive. There are sharp contrasts and defined edges, but they’re fleeting. The spray can be settled like a light wash or frothing along the tops of waves. I broke out my masking fluid to preserve the white parts, but it just didn’t give the depth I wanted so I resorted to a few spots of white acrylic at the end. I used three shades of blue, a green, and a touch of Payne’s Gray (watercolor from tubes, not the pencils) too.

I noticed that the watercolor pencils are a little finicky about how to set the color. If I draw with them first and then add water, it lifts up the pigments and dilutes it pretty thoroughly. If I draw on top of wet paper, sometimes it seems to make no mark and other times it drops a strong piece of color. I found the most consistent results in dipping the pencil itself into water and then drawing/painting with that, using extra water to dilute or soften as needed. Sometimes I’d let it all dry and then use the watercolor pencils more like colored pencils so I could get some hard lines. They’re great for traveling – much more convenient than watercolor tubes – so they will definitely get more use.

Trilogy of Shadow Puppets

These frames reminded me of the soot around a fireplace so I created these three illustrations of shadow puppets. I mostly picked these animals because I thought the hand shapes were interesting. Now that I see them together, I realized they’re all animals in the American wilderness. I imagine them as part of a tale told at a remote cabin in the woods.

Shadow Pupper: Deer • 10" x 12" • ink and charcoal

Shadow Pupper: Deer • 10″ x 12″ • ink and charcoal

Shadow Pupper: Eagle • 12" x 10" • ink and charcoal

Shadow Pupper: Eagle • 12″ x 10″ • ink and charcoal

Shadow Pupper: Wolf • 10" x 12" • ink and charcoal

Shadow Pupper: Wolf • 10″ x 12″ • ink and charcoal

Coffin Vogue

Coffin Vogue

Coffin Vogue • 2.25″ x 7.25″ each

A little creative reuse led to these spooky holiday decorations. Earlier this year, I bought a half-dozen frames that I intended to use for wall art. Often frames will come with both a wall hook and a fold-out arm so they can be used on the wall or standalone on a surface. These particular frames are mostly wire so the fold-out arm was plainly visible and looked wrong. I carefully wrenched them off of the back of the frames and the metal hinges holding them. I like to reuse materials whenever possible so I stared at these for a little while to figure out if I could do anything with them. I noticed the shape looked a bit like a stylized coffin, and they’re covered in black velvet. Perfect opportunity to try out velvet painting!

Since the coffin shape was a bit off-kilter, I thought the skeletons should be too. I decided they should all be striking poses a la Vogue. I used white acrylic paint on a very dry brush – any amount of water, including water leftover on a freshly-washed brush, kills the effect. To further spiff it up I added a sparkly silver border with washable Crayola sparkle glue. There was a small amount of black ribbon attached to the back (formerly to provide tension to the fold-up arm) that I folded back on itself and sewed into a small hanging loop. Styling!

Bathers Series

It’s the first day of summer, an excellent time to debut more work in the Bathers series. There are now six! Here are all of them.

Bathers I

Bathers I • 9.75” x 11.75”

Bathers II

Bathers II • 9.75” x 11.75”

Bathers III

Bathers III • 9.75” x 11.75”

Bathers IV

Bathers IV • 9.75” x 11.75”

Bathers V

Bathers V • 9.75” x 11.75”

Bathers VI

Bathers VI • 9.75” x 11.75”

Peace, Love, and Understanding

Peace, Love, and Understanding

Peace, Love, and Understanding • 7.5″ x 8″

I found these little frames with comic-strip-like sections and thought it would work well with a three-part phrase. I immediately thought of Elvis Costello singing “what’s so funny about peace, love, and understanding?” I thought about tattoos as a way to show these words, and a few small sketches later came up with this.

I didn’t use any photo references on this one so it’s a little more cartoony than my recent work. I wanted to use realistic-looking tattoo styles and locations, with each piece seen as tattoos are often seen: as the decorative pieces peeking out from clothes.

The arm tattoo I imagined as “Rest In Peace” with a calavera, a decorated skull just barely visible. The ankle tattoo: “Love Kills”, with the V as a dagger into a heart. The back tattoo I never fully figured out beyond “Understanding is the only way” but I imagined it has another few words there.

I used this to test out some new watercolor pencils and quickly realized I should have used thicker paper if I wanted to treat it like a true watercolor. After I added the ink outlines, I filled in more texture, color, and contrast with regular Prismacolor pencils instead.

Starting sketch

Starting sketch

Before adding water

Before adding water

After water & ink, before more color

After water & ink, before more color

At the Paris Exhibition, 1900

At the Paris Exhibition, 1900

At the Paris Exhibition, 1900 • 14.25″ x 17.25″

This is based on a photo from an exhibition at the World’s Fair in Paris in 1900. It was assembled by W.E.B. DuBois “with the goal of demonstrating the progress and commemorating the lives of African Americans at the turn of the century.” I found this while browsing the collection at the Library of Congress. Her expression and outfit really stood out to me. Unfortunately there’s no name attached to it, so I don’t know who she is. I named this so it could either be interpreted as her being in the exhibition, or attending the exhibition. Maybe she did both!

I have some lovely mid-toned paper made with coffee, which is an excellent base for two-toned charcoal drawings. I start with the light colors first so they’ll stay crisp and are less likely to get muddied by black charcoal smears. It’s easy to add black charcoal; it’s nearly impossible to add white charcoal after the fact.

In progress

In progress

Waiting & Watching

Waiting & Watching

Waiting & Watching • 11″ x 9″

This chunky wooden frame reminded me of the aesthetic of Bruegel’s earthy illustrations or Goya’s creatures. I felt a gargoyle would suit it, so I found this fellow for a start. I wanted to give it more of a body so after I drew the head I opted to draw its paws, clawed, to echo the fangs.

Once I started filling in more of the body, I thought it really needed something else to balance the picture. A bird! I found a reference photo with just the right expression: mostly clueless, but slightly wary. It was also a nice light touch against the darkness of the gargoyle.

I’ll leave it up to you as to which one is waiting and which one is watching.

Trilogy of Munchies

Breakfast Time!

Breakfast Time! • 8″ x 8″

Tea Time!

Tea Time! • 8″ x 8″

Snack Time!

Snack Time! • 8″ x 8″

I came across these frames and they reminded me of old-time kitchen appliances – well-worn, chipping a little, but perfectly functional. I decided they could use some tasty food to go along with them. These are ink & oil pastel illustrations. Enjoy!

Bathers I & II

Bathers I

Bathers I • 9.75” x 11.75”

Bathers II

Bathers II • 9.75” x 11.75”

I found a few frames with an art deco feel and decided to make a few illustrations to fit. The process on these was pretty simple: colored pencil outlines on watercolor paper, and the rest filled in with watercolors.

These reminded me of something you might find in a beach cottage, so I just went for the first thing that came to mind: turn-of-the-century bathers. I worked from the memory of Halloween costumes so the suits may not be entirely authentic. Cute though!