Posts Tagged: landscape

Harvest: Avocados

Harvest: Avocados

Harvest: Avocados

3rd of 4 in the Harvest series – avocados, cut open to show off the green insides and shiny pits. Same approach as the others: start at the bottom and slowly develop a pattern along the way.

These are made with Prismacolor colored pencils, and on this one I used seven colors total: green and yellow for the insides (blended with ivory), grape purple and grass green for the pebbly skins, and brown, dark brown, and yellow (blended with ivory) for the pits. It took a try or two to figure out the right appearance for the pitted halves.

Harvest: Blueberries

Harvest: Blueberries

Harvest: Blueberries

Another fruit in the Harvest series – this time, a little pile of blueberries. This one’s more of an experiment in subtle patterns within a dense texture. I varied the amounts of blues and purples, and tucked in the stem area here and there to aim for something random-looking but balanced. I also made the front/bottom area a higher contrast and slightly bigger so it would give a proper sense of perspective.

Like the persimmons, I started on the bottom and gradually worked my way up. It got a little tricky to avoid a pattern that was too regular. Some areas started to get that fishscale-like regularity, and I found the best way to avoid that was to jump to different parts of the image while laying out the initial blueberry outlines. I think the hand (and eye) tend towards patterns that are both (1) regular in frequency and (2) trailing off in whatever direction you write. It’s the same issue with writing sentences on whiteboards, though (annoyingly) it can happen even on a tiny scale like this. Sometimes the best thing to do is to keep interrupting and switch to something different frequently to insert the randomness yourself.

Corridor

Corridor • 12" x 12"

Corridor • 12″ x 12″

A few months ago I had a little extra time in the evening and ended up at Corridor with a glass of wine and my laptop. While I was there, I was struck by the lighting and the rhythm of the layout. Two other people were there, quietly enjoying a dinner, so I surreptitiously snagged a photo that I decided to make into a painting.As with all paintings with photo references, I start with a sketch. It’s nearly impossible to correct weird angles or proportions after the fact so I always do this when it’s from a photo. The lighting in this is a bit darker than I’ve done before – a good test of me slowly attempting to improve the balance of dark tones in my paintings. Part of the challenge is that I get them looking right in person and then the photo is just…off. When I take a photo or scan them I always need to adjust them to match what I see. The dark tones are built up from a mix of burnt umber and ultramarine blue.

I listened to the High Resolution Design podcast while painting this one. I think it helped keep me in an industrial design headspace while I was painting all of these lights.

 
 
 
 
 

Sketch

Sketch

Yellow ochre

Yellow ochre

Burnt Sienna

Burnt Sienna

Burnt Umber

Burnt Umber

Ultramarine Blue

Ultramarine Blue

Greens

Greens

More blue

More blue

Harvest: Persimmons

Harvest: Persimmons

Harvest: Persimmons

Here’s a bright little drawing of persimmons from memory. I drew this with Prismacolor pencils to experiment with blending techniques to replicate the muted sheen on the fruit. To get this look, I lightly filled in layer of orange and red and/or brown around the edges, and then pressed hard to blend a peach color for the sheen and orange for the rest. The leaves are a mix of two shades of green, ivory, and a pinkish brown.

I started with the fruits at the bottom and completed each one before moving to the next because I wasn’t sure whether I wanted to add something else in here (a pixie in hiding? a knit fruit? a glass ball? make one float up?). I briefly contemplated an Escher-like transformation of the leaves into birds. I ultimately opted to fill it in as you see because I liked the visual rhythm.

I’d started this illustration a while back during a Two Buck Tuesday event at Kaleid Gallery, and felt compelled to finish it now that we’re well into fall. I’ll be taking it full circle and bringing it back to Kaleid for the annual HARK! Holiday Show and Sale in about a month.

Painting the Fjord at Tahuya

Tahuya • 24" x 36"

Tahuya • 24″ x 36″

This is a painting of Tahuya, a spot in Washington that has a genuine inland fjord. Fjords: not all in Norway!

My sister Tiffany has a neat little place right on the water and this is a painting from a photo she took just outside. Since it’s a fjord that connects to the ocean, it’s saltwater and there are bunches of oysters, clams, and mussels. The water’s edge is littered with the shells which get bleached by the sun over time and can be seen in the shallows.

There were a couple of surprising color behaviors while I painted this. I can’t recall this happening with other paintings, but the gel that I use as an isolation coat between layers added a slightly purple sheen in some light, at some angles. That made it tricky to see my progress. Check out this video below to see how it looked mid-painting from one angle to another.

The other color trickery emerged when I got a scan of the finished painting. All of the dark areas are primarily a combination of ultramarine blue and burnt umber. The ultramarine blue in particular made the ripples look pretty dark – correct to my eye when I see it in person. The scan lost a lot of the nuance, though, and it took a half dozen adjustment layers & masks to get the image resembling the real thing. The scans usually don’t need much (if any) adjustment, and I’m not quite sure what it is about this one that made it different (technique? dynamic range?).


Almost forgot to take a pic of the sketch

Sketch

Yellow ochre, painted outside in downtown Campbell

Yellow ochre

Midtones, painted back at home

Burnt sienna

Getting more range with burnt umber

Burnt umber

At some point after the first round of blues

Some blues

Mostly shot this to figure out how it was looking

In progress

Sketch: The Palace Theater at The Speakeasy

The Palace Theater @The Speakeasy

The Palace Theater @The Speakeasy

A sketch from a discreet location – the Palace Theater at The Speakeasy in San Francisco. Alan and I have been supporters from their earlier days as Boxcar Theater through this latest, grandest iteration of The Speakeasy. We were there this Sunday to join as extras on a little promotional material. As part of that, I had more opportunity than usual to check out the Palace Theater portion. Enjoy! Or better yet, see it yourself.

Roots series

Roots: Carrot • 8"x10" (in frame)

Roots: Carrot • 8″x10″ (in frame)

Happy May Day! In celebration of the warmer weather and the end of the drought, I created this series of things that grow in the ground. I always like cutaway-style illustrations so I created a view of what’s above and below the ground.

I’d found these chicken wire frames last year. I really liked the style except for one part: they had black velvet swing arms so they could be free-standing. The arms really distracted from the chicken wire, so I removed them and employed them in a little creative use last year.

As for the rest of it..? No deep meaning here, just an excuse to study the details and spend some time with watercolors.

Starting sketch

Starting sketch

First layer of blues

First layer of blues

In progress

In progress

Roots: Carrot

Roots: Carrot

Roots: Garlic

Roots: Garlic

Roots: Ginger

Roots: Ginger

Roots: Lettuce

Roots: Lettuce

Roots: Onion

Roots: Onion

Roots: Potato

Roots: Potato

Roots: Radish

Roots: Radish

Chinese Folktales on Repainted Calendars

Chinese Folktales (all 6 calendar repaints)

Chinese Folktales (all 6 calendar repaints)

Scrolls are easy to transport

Scrolls are easy to transport

For the new year I’ve finished a small set of art I started originally back in 2009. Each of these started off as a giveaway calendar from a Chinese restaurant. I’ve been collecting these and “repainting” them by painting over everything except the main image. I attempted to match both the colors and the painting style of the printed art as best I could to preserve the original look as much as possible.

Based on the animal (or fish) on each one, I chose a related Chinese folktale or mythology to illustrate. I also chose one element to outline to make it stand out. I watched a lot of cartoons growing up and always found the juxtaposition of a painted background with a flat, outlined animation cel set a particular tone about what merited attention.

Here they are in the window display at Kaleid Gallery, from left to right:

The Dragon God
Dragons are symbols of power, strength, and good luck, and have particular control over water.

The Monkey’s Loss
The monkeys abandoned peaches for corn, and then watermelons, and then lost it all in pursuit of a rabbit.

The Farmer’s Fence
The farmer, mourning the loss of a sheep after the fence broke, fails to mend it and later loses more.

The Rabbit In the Moon
The rabbit is a companion of the moon goddess Chang’e, and uses a mortar and pestle to pound the elixir of life.

Ye Xian (the “Chinese Cinderella”)
Ye Xian, a peasant girl, befriends a magical carp who helps her win the hand of the prince.

The Rooster’s Crown
After a skilled archer shot the eight suns, the ninth hid away until the rooster could coax it out.

Weathered

Front view

Front view

Side view

Side view

This one is for friends Ted and Claire who live in Colorado, land of extremely variable weather. They wanted a painting that reflected some of the color and variety they see on a daily basis. After consulting with them about what they liked, I went through a few rounds of Photoshop mockups of possibilities. The combination of these large clouds with a hint of reddish mountains won out.

I decided to make a triptych out of it rather than use one large canvas. Since these were considerably bigger canvases than I could paint on the table I usually use, I painted them propped against my closet.

The mountains came together right away. Probably helps that the tones mostly matched the base layers of yellow ochre and burnt sienna. They were so fast and natural to paint that it made me think of Bob Ross. He must have made some happy little mountains for all of those happy little trees to be around.

The clouds involved a lot of drybrushing. I end up mashing my brushes quite a bit with this, but I was pretty good about washing them immediately and they don’t seem too much worse for the wear. I skewed a little lighter on the overall look so I could focus on the subtleties in the pink and golden tones while keeping the weight of the big puffy cumulus clouds.

The progression on this one was a little odd in that it hit a stage where I was pretty happy with it early on. That’s good and bad: the good thing is that it’s motivating to see it come together right away, and the bad thing is that it can make me nervous about moving ahead and messing it up. Once I started adding in the pink tones, I could see more clearly how much more was needed. Also, on some paintings I just get a clear sense of when I’m done, like my recent tomato painting. On others, I see a point where it’s close to where I want it to be and I need to stop myself from overworking it. This was one of those.

It’s ready to go to its new home in Colorado.

Original mockup

Original mockup

The painting space

The painting space

First tone layer

First tone layer

Second tone layer

Second tone layer

Carving out the sky

Carving out the sky

Puffy white highlights

Puffy white highlights

Pink tones

Pink tones

Highlights and soft edges

Highlights and soft edges

Japantown SJ

View from Roy’s Coffee (SJ Japantown)

I have no explanation for the recent art hiatus other than a mental block. Been doing a little embroidery, a little drawing, a little pumpkin carving. Oh, and I ended up on a jury for a criminal case for almost a month. While in the courtroom, I got a notebook to keep track of details. During the little bits of downtime when the lawyers approached the bench, I started sketching things around the courtroom. Unfortunately the notebook has to stay in the custody of the court, so those handful of sketches are probably destroyed by now. But…it did get me sketching again, and it left me with a little free time during lunch.

The Hall of Justice is about seven or eight blocks from San Jose’s Japantown, so I had lots of lunches down there. It’s tiny–just a couple of blocks long–and just a cool little place with some great restaurants. I frequented a coffee shop called Roy’s Station which is in a remodeled auto service station, complete with original 50’s Coke machine. If you go, try the Spiced Dirty Chai (unsweetened chai + espresso). I’d had a few artist trading cards with me, so I started sketching the view from Roy’s. It was originally just the card on the right, but I felt it was a bit stark so I added another to make it a bit more complete.

It’s not quite accurate as I sat in three different spots, and it reminded me of how freaking hard it is to get perspective looking right. Even if I had a straight edge, get the vanishing points just a tad off and it’s going to look wrong. I like it as it looks, but when I was sitting in front of the real thing I winced at how torqued some of the distances ended up. Note to self: pick out the repeating patterns, like the flags, first and work from there…

That pointy thing on the far right is a sculpture. According to the guy that came and chatted with me for a bit during day 2 on this, represents how the lives of Japanese-American citizens were forced in a new direction during WWII. Fortunately, the local community was able to get re-established in the same spot after the war, and preserve a very cool part of SJ.