Posts Tagged: figure

Creepy Ancestors

3 of 30 original watercolor portraits • 3.2" x 4.2" each

3 of 30 original watercolor portraits • 3.2″ x 4.2″ each

I found these nice sleeves printed in the style of the “carte de visite”, the collectible trading card craze of the mid-19th century. Slightly larger than modern trading cards, this style of card was used for portraits of friends, family, and celebrities.

It’s been a little while since I’ve done watercolor so I created a bunch of tiny portraits based on photos that would have been the right era for these styles (mid-1850s). Because it’s Halloween, and I wanted to loosen up a bit, I leaned a bit more towards caricatures and intentionally skewed them to look creepy.

Ms. P.B.F.

Ms. P.B.F.  ~sold~

Mr. R.B.M.

Mr. R.B.M.  $13

Ms. D.R.F.

Ms. D.R.F.  $13

Mr. P.B.M.

Mr. P.B.M.  $13

Ms. R.B.F.

Ms. R.B.F.  $13

Mr. D.G.M.

Mr. D.G.M. ~sold~

Ms. P.S.F.

Ms. P.S.F.  $13

Mr. R.C.M.

Mr. R.C.M.  $13

Ms. D.G.F.

Ms. D.G.F.  $13

Mr. B.P.M.

Mr. B.P.M. ~sold~

Ms. R.C.F.

Ms. R.C.F.  $13

Mr. D.M.M.

Mr. D.M.M.  $13

Ms. P.W.F.

Ms. P.W.F.  $13

Mr. E.R.M.

Mr. E.R.M.  $13

Ms. D.P.F.

Ms. D.P.F.  $13

Mr. P.D.M.

Mr. P.D.M.  $13

Ms. C.R.F.

Ms. C.R.F. ~sold~

Mr. O.D.M.

Mr. O.D.M. ~sold~

Mr. P.M.M.

Mr. P.M.M.  $13

Mr. R.P.M.

Mr. R.P.M.  $13

Ms. F.P.D.

Ms. F.P.D.  $13

Mr. P.S.M.

Mr. P.S.M. ~sold~

Ms. R.S.F.

Ms. R.S.F.  $13

Mr. D.S.M.

Mr. D.S.M. ~sold~

Mr. P.G.M.

Mr. P.G.M.  $13

Ms. S.R.F.

Ms. S.R.F. ~sold~

Ms. F.R.D.

Ms. F.R.D. ~sold~

Mr. P.W.M.

Mr. P.W.M.  $13

Ms. U.R.B.

Ms. U.R.B.  $13

Ms. R.F.D.

Ms. R.F.D.  $13

Coffin Vogue

Coffin Vogue

Coffin Vogue • 2.25″ x 7.25″ each

A little creative reuse led to these spooky holiday decorations. Earlier this year, I bought a half-dozen frames that I intended to use for wall art. Often frames will come with both a wall hook and a fold-out arm so they can be used on the wall or standalone on a surface. These particular frames are mostly wire so the fold-out arm was plainly visible and looked wrong. I carefully wrenched them off of the back of the frames and the metal hinges holding them. I like to reuse materials whenever possible so I stared at these for a little while to figure out if I could do anything with them. I noticed the shape looked a bit like a stylized coffin, and they’re covered in black velvet. Perfect opportunity to try out velvet painting!

Since the coffin shape was a bit off-kilter, I thought the skeletons should be too. I decided they should all be striking poses a la Vogue. I used white acrylic paint on a very dry brush – any amount of water, including water leftover on a freshly-washed brush, kills the effect. To further spiff it up I added a sparkly silver border with washable Crayola sparkle glue. There was a small amount of black ribbon attached to the back (formerly to provide tension to the fold-up arm) that I folded back on itself and sewed into a small hanging loop. Styling!

The Raven

The Raven

The Raven • 28.125″ x 34.125″

This moody piece came together from many different sources. I found this gothic (or possibly medieval)-looking frame at a Goodwill attached to a beaten-up print from JCPenney. Around the same time, I was working on a UI design that needed sample content and had picked the phrase “Why is a raven like a writing desk?” to use. It occurred to me that both this Alice in Wonderland riddle and Poe’s poem “The Raven” reference the same themes: writing, ravens, and a touch of madness. I envisioned a frustrated writer toiling in the late hours by candlelight – a good fit for the heaviness of the frame.

While making the initial sketch, I decided it would be interesting if the writer was himself a raven and was using his own quills to attempt to write. I liked the idea of arranging the pose so this wasn’t obvious at first, but a closer look at the back of the head would look more like feathers than hair, and what could have been seen as the arm would actually be a beak.

I gathered up dozens of photo references for desks, candlelight, and ravens, but I knew it’d be tricky to get the perspective, pose, and lighting right without a proper mockup of the full scene. I briefly considered getting a 3D program to set up a scene and ultimately decided it would look too artificial. Instead, I built a scene out of a shoebox, a tiny flashlight, a 9″ posable model (the excellent A9 Ranger from Digital Double), a few odds and ends, and lots of paper and cardboard. After taking about 50 photos from every conceivable angle, I whittled it down a winner and enlisted my husband and frequent model Alan to mimic the pose for additional clothing/lighting reference.

The frame is pretty shallow so I tracked down a 24″ x 30″ canvas on panel for the painting. The beginning process was pretty similar to my other paintings. I’ve come to realize that after my tone layers & ultramarine blue, I often go to either greens, purples, or whites as the next few layers. These are usually the ones that start bringing individual areas much closer to a finished state. I also set the frame around the painting in the later stages to make sure the tonal range matched.

Like previous paintings, I’d restricted myself to using ultramarine blue for the dark areas initially; it, combined with burnt umber, can often make a rich and interesting dark color (to see this in action: every painting in the Statement series uses this blend except Statement III, which uses a carbon black for the helmet and jacket to make it stand out). Near the end the overall tones still looked a bit too soft, so I browsed through paintings of candlelit scenes for inspiration. This helped me shore up the candles, and this painting by Pehr Hilleström in particular made me decide to use carbon black to make the figure and feathers stand out.

The back of the painting is papered over with a copy of Edgar Allen Poe’s poem. I ended up leaving out references to “Why is a raven like a writing desk?” but will leave you with the solution I’d come up with and still prefer most: because they both have inky quills.

 

Concept & reference

Concept sketch w/ reference

Unlit scene with A9 ranger

Unlit scene with A9 ranger

Primary reference

Primary reference

One of dozens of alternates

One of dozens of alternates

Initial sketch for canvas

Initial canvas sketch

Yellow ochre

Yellow ochre

Burnt sienna

Burnt sienna

Burnt Umber

Burnt umber

Ultramarine blue

Ultramarine blue

Pink tones

Pink tones

Green tones

Green tones

Yellow & cream

Yellow & cream

More blues

More blues

Yellow and black accents

Yellow and black accents

Belva Lockwood

Illustration of Belva Lockwood

Belva Lockwood • 2016 • 10″ x 12.5″

Here’s another piece in the same style as my Edith O’Gorman and the Language of Flowers illustration from last year. Like that one, she came from browsing the Library of Congress archives for interesting people. Again, in the spirit slightly odd vintage photo captions, she was described as “famous lawyer and bicycle rider.”

Belva Lockwood caught my eye because of her serious demeanor and more masculine clothing. She was one the first female lawyers to practice in the US, and the first to appear before the Supreme Court, overcoming “many social and personal restrictions relating to her gender.” She also was the first woman to appear as an official candidate (on printed ballots) as President of the United States, in 1884 and again in 1888 for the National Equal Rights Party. Had this photo been taken a little later, I’m guessing that would have been a more noteworthy description than “bicycle rider”.

For this interpretation using the language of flowers, I’ve adorned her background from bottom to top with the following:

  • Cactus, to represent endurance
  • Palm leaves, to represent victory and success
  • A crown of roses, to represent a reward of merit for her hard work

Statement VIII

Statement VIII • 10" x 8"

Statement VIII • 10″ x 8″

Over the last year I’ve slowed down on new paintings in the Statement series in favor of other projects, but there was one more I hadn’t posted yet. This one is my photographer friend Jillian who took the reference shot for Statement I. During a different shoot for reference photos I noticed she was wearing a white shirt while I saw her reviewing photos. I asked to include her in this series, and here she is!

Since this was in her studio, there was a large white background on one side of the image. It had very subtle shadows and lighting which was interesting to pin down. It was so bright relative to the rest of the scene that I opted to put a warm tone on the rest: the crates on the floor, the stacked reflectors on the left, and the wall and floor. I kept the dark details in the blue-ish range to stay soft while still providing sufficient contrast from the warm background.

It’s always satisfying to find a few small high-contrast details to paint. The reflection on the camera screen was a fun piece to do as well as the embroidery on the shirt. Nicely balanced!

Sketch

Sketch

Yellow Ochre

Yellow Ochre

Burnt Sienna

Burnt Sienna

Burnt Umber

Burnt Umber

Ultramarine Blue

Ultramarine Blue

First round of white

First round of white

Cooler tones

Cooler tones

Second round of white

Second round of white

Warmer tones

Warmer tones

Highlights

Highlights

Embroidery detail

Embroidery detail

Another warm tone wash

Another warm tone wash

At the Paris Exhibition, 1900

At the Paris Exhibition, 1900

At the Paris Exhibition, 1900 • 14.25″ x 17.25″

This is based on a photo from an exhibition at the World’s Fair in Paris in 1900. It was assembled by W.E.B. DuBois “with the goal of demonstrating the progress and commemorating the lives of African Americans at the turn of the century.” I found this while browsing the collection at the Library of Congress. Her expression and outfit really stood out to me. Unfortunately there’s no name attached to it, so I don’t know who she is. I named this so it could either be interpreted as her being in the exhibition, or attending the exhibition. Maybe she did both!

I have some lovely mid-toned paper made with coffee, which is an excellent base for two-toned charcoal drawings. I start with the light colors first so they’ll stay crisp and are less likely to get muddied by black charcoal smears. It’s easy to add black charcoal; it’s nearly impossible to add white charcoal after the fact.

In progress

In progress

Edith O’Gorman and the Language of Flowers

Illustration of Edith O'Gorman

Edith O’Gorman • 10.5″ x 12.5″

I’ve been browsing the Library of Congress archives for interesting things to draw. This 19th century photo by Matthew Brady stood out to me because it was a woman (not too many in the set) with an interesting expression and an even more interesting description: “Edith O’Gorman. Escaped nun from Canada?”

She has a bit of infamy around her story. After serving in a nunnery in Canada, she published a book in 1913 called “The Trials and Persecutions of Miss Edith O’Gorman” detailing stories of terrible treatment. It looks like she spent the rest of her life traveling as a lecturer (adding to an anti-Catholic sentiment stirred up by the press at the time) and avoiding death threats. She appears to have changed her name a couple of times and embellished her Irish heritage a bit along the way. In my cursory research there’s quite the mix of true accounts vs sensationalism, but she clearly riled up people and made herself a prominent figure.

Rather than celebrate or demonize her, I opted to use a period-appropriate technique of representing what I imagine motivated her. The language of flowers was popular in the late 19th century/Victorian era as a discreet way to express feelings. I took a loose interpretation of this with the following:

  • Easter lilies, to represent the influence of her time at the convent
  • Chestnuts, with the meaning “do me justice”
  • Aloe vera, to represent grieving

I’ll definitely do more portraits in this style as I find interesting people in that era.

Taking a Statement

Taking a Statement • 2015, 12"x12"

Taking a Statement • 12″ x 12″ (two options for orientation shown)

I got a commission recently from an unexpected source. A few months ago I started posting close-up details of my paintings & drawings on Instagram and Tumblr. I figured it would be an interesting opportunity to show off the details you’d see if you could see it in person. One such post was a detail of Statement VII (the doctor): specifically, a close-up view of his hands jotting down notes. This caught the eye of our friends Kevin and Allison as they both work in writing/journalism and they inquired about a commission. I offered to change up details if they liked (different colors? new photo shoot in the same pose with one of them?) but they opted for a painting from the original photo.

The detail I posted on Instagram is about 3″x3″, and the new painting I created is 12″x12″. When I checked the original photo, I realized I’d skewed it a bit more warm/orange on the original painting. I liked some of the purple tones so I shifted a little bit back towards that for this version of it. I also pulled the crop back slightly to show cuff details for both hands.

While I was working on it, my friend Jeremy saw it and pointed out that it had a distinctly different feel to it when viewed from different angles. I often adjust the angle on reference photos for new paintings, but it never occurred to me to try that for this one. I rotated it a bunch of ways and decided that there were two that I felt looked best, so when I completed it I added hardware to allow it to hang two different ways: the original orientation, or turned 45 degrees for a diamond shape. I’m not sure which I prefer: I figure that can be a choice made based on where it’s going and what they’re in the mood to see.

Enjoy your painting, Kevin & Allie!

Detail from Statement VII

Detail from Statement VII

Starting sketch

Starting sketch

Yellow ochre

Yellow ochre

Burnt sienna

Burnt sienna

Burnt umber

Burnt umber

Blue washes

Blue washes

Pinks & purples

Pinks & purples

Lightening

Lightening

Adding more white

Adding more white

Warming it up

Warming it up

Edna and Barbara Have Coffee

Edna and Barbara Have Coffee • 12"x12" • 2015

Edna and Barbara Have Coffee • 12″x12″ • 2015

This was a leisurely-to-finish painting based on an old photo that I later realized didn’t quite have enough detail in it. I originally started this back in February with the hope of completing it for submission into an art show. The show was canceled so I shelved this for a while in favor of other projects. I’d only gotten as far as the burnt umber layer, and it’s been lurking incomplete around my art table for a while. I decided it was high time to finish this one.

I initially started running into the lack of detail while working on the (too pale) skintones. I considered keeping it pretty blocky as I liked how the clothing looked, but it just didn’t look right against the rest of it. So, when in doubt: more dots. While mixing grays from scratch I ended up with some nice purple tones so I shifted the color scheme towards that. I used a bit of crimson to offset a few muddy tones, and right at the end, toned down some of the detail around Edna (on the left) to add a little more perspective.

Initial Sketch

Initial Sketch

Yellow Ochre

Yellow Ochre

Burnt Sienna

Burnt Sienna

Burnt Umber

Burnt Umber

Ultramarine Blue

Ultramarine Blue

Pale Tones

Pale Tones

Purples

Purples

Tablecloth Details

Tablecloth Details

Warming It Up

Warming It Up

Final Details

Final Details

Escalation

Escalation • 25.25" x 14.75" • 2015

Escalation • 25.25″ x 14.75″ • 2015

I came across an art show “call for entry” about an upcoming show looking for a range of commentary about guns. There are a lot of potential themes here: power, protection, sport, identity. The one that stuck with me was the use of a gun to amplify expression – specifically to sharpen and escalate an emotion.

The first part is in charcoal: a pointed finger, a direct expression that can still contain a great deal of context and shades of gray. By a subtle change of gesture – invoking a pointed gun – it both heightens the tension and throws a conflict into a stark contrast where fewer options exist. The use of ink also casts it in the light of something that has frozen in its state, a rendering that might be in a newspaper or book.

I came up with the gestures first and took a few reference photos. To get the best contrast, I moved around until I got the light source to the front and top of the pointed finger. I had the idea that the “gun” gesture hand should be more stark in appearance than the other. To figure out how this would look, I made a Photoshop mockup. While doing this I decided to try out different mat colors, and it occurred to me that I could make a custom mat shape too. I started with the standard mat rectangle and added angled edges to show the progression of the escalation.

Creating the charcoal hand was pretty straightforward. Charcoal is (relatively) forgiving: you can build up the shadows, and then pull back in the highlights and lighten areas with an eraser afterward. Ink: not so much. My first attempt was a bit messy, and I realized my reference photo for the gun gesture was a little bigger than the other. I decided to use the first reference photo for all of the hand except the thumb. This helped unify the two tremendously. I also changed my approach to the ink and used a brush pen so I could get more line variety. It took a lot of concentration to work this way, but more care in the linework paid off. Of course…when I cut the mat I realized I’d drawn the ink hand too close to the edge of the paper. To fix this, I cut out the hand and mounted it on a new piece of paper. Ta da!

Reference hand (plus cat)

Reference (plus cat)

Photoshop mockup

Photoshop mockup

Detail of charcoal hand

Detail of charcoal hand

Detail of ink hand

Detail of ink hand