Peace, Love, and Understanding series

All four Peace, Love, and Understanding illustrations

All four Peace, Love, and Understanding illustrations

I made a few more three-panel illustrations with the phrase “Peace, Love, and Understanding” spelled out across tattoos. Not too much story on these; I mostly picked it as an excuse to draw different people and to think through the meaning of tattoos. “Peace” and “Love” are pretty easy to incorporate into tattoos…but “Understanding”? Much more difficult. The best I could do on that one was either including it in a longer phrase, or taking the education angle. It was getting quite challenging to not repeat tattoo locations too.

Peace, Love, and Understanding I • 2016

Peace, Love, and Understanding I • 2016

Peace, Love, and Understanding II • 2017

Peace, Love, and Understanding II • 2017

Peace, Love, and Understanding III • 2017

Peace, Love, and Understanding III • 2017

Peace, Love, and Understanding IV • 2017

Peace, Love, and Understanding IV • 2017

 

Bel Bacio Featured Artist for February

What you see when you walk into Bel Bacio this month

What you see when you walk into Bel Bacio this month

I just finished hanging a dozen pieces of art at Bel Bacio coffee shop in San Jose’s Little Italy. There’s an entrance wall and a front room with three walls (and a window), so I chose a mix of paintings, illustration, and prints for each of the four walls. I matched nearby colors wherever possible and grouped them together in four themes:

The "pleasant outing" wall

The “pleasant outing” wall

The "working man" wall

The “working man” wall

The "focus on photography" wall

The “focus on photography” wall

Re-paint: The Rooster’s Crown

The Rooster's Crown • 12.5" x 29"

The Rooster’s Crown • 12.5″ x 29″

This is the last of 6 calendars I’ve re-painted with Chinese folktales in time for the Lunar New Year 2017. While it’s the Year of the Rooster, I’ve heard that the Chinese calendar alternates masculine and feminine years so it is more accurately the Year of the Hen. A fire hen, at that!

This calendar’s story is about how the rooster got his crown. In the early days of the earth, there were nine suns which scorched the plants and cause people to live in caves. A famous archer, Yi, shoots down eight of the suns using a pond’s reflection. The ninth sun goes into hiding, casting the land into darkness. The rooster is the only one who can coax it to come back out, and for that, he is granted his crown (comb).

Like the sheep calendar, this one has oversize flowers too. There’s also a little lazy duplication in the green plants by the chicks where the same art is copied and resized slightly. I also ended up painting out extraneous plants along the top and side edges to balance out the composition better.

Original calendar

Original calendar

Background colored

Background colored

Water added, branch removed

Water added, branch removed

Re-paint: The Farmer’s Fence

The Farmer's Fence • 12.5" x 30"

The Farmer’s Fence • 12.5″ x 30″

This calendar re-paint is about a story of a farmer who loses a sheep because a wolf snuck through a broken part of a fence. His neighbors tell him he should fix the fence, but he is too focused on the loss of the sheep. The next night, the wolf returns and he loses more sheep. It is a cautionary tale about not dwelling on the past.

This calendar features an odd visual quirk I noticed on some of them – the sense of proportion gets really odd with the foliage. The flowers in the midground are massive. I imagine the calendar designs are just combining pieces of illustrations. On the Rooster calendar, it’s pretty clear these are different illustrations combined together.

I opted to paint similar flowers at a more accurate scale by the resting sheep. That area originally had italicized text in a similar color scheme that read “Good Luck!”

In each of the calendars I’ve chosen one element to outline, and here I opted to keep the fence relatively flat and cartoon-like. I added more subtle detail in the grass by using brown to indicate the (now treadworn) path through the broken fence.

Original calendar

Original calendar

Good Luck!

Good Luck!

Background filled in

Background filled in

Re-paint: The Monkey’s Loss

The Monkey's Loss • 12.5" x 30"

The Monkey’s Loss • 12.5″ x 30″

This calendar re-paint reflects a Chinese folktale about a little monkey who came down from the mountain. It took a little while to find a folktale about monkeys that was not about the Monkey King, a story too big to illustrate here and usually depicting the Monkey King with a more human-like body (plus clothing).

The monkey, coming down from the mountain, is excited to find peaches and gathers them. Further down, he finds corn and abandons the peaches for that. Continuing on, the corn is left behind in favor of a watermelon. Then a rabbit rushes by, and he drops the watermelon to pursue it. After a chase, the rabbit is lost and the monkey ends up with nothing.

The illustration on this calendar is the most abstract one of the calendars I found in how it uses blotches of colors for the monkeys, rocks, and leaves. The monkeys were originally so blotchy that I filled in all of their white areas with yellow ochre so they’d stand out from the rock and sky. Still: did you notice there are three? I didn’t at first.

On a few of these repaints I’ve ended up painting out additional foliage from the edges because it was too distracting. I left the sky pretty simple since the rock and plants have a lot of texture.

Original calendar

Original calendar

Sides painted

Sides painted

Before adding details

Before adding details

Chinese Folktales on Repainted Calendars

Chinese Folktales (all 6 calendar repaints)

Chinese Folktales (all 6 calendar repaints)

Scrolls are easy to transport

Scrolls are easy to transport

For the new year I’ve finished a small set of art I started originally back in 2009. Each of these started off as a giveaway calendar from a Chinese restaurant. I’ve been collecting these and “repainting” them by painting over everything except the main image. I attempted to match both the colors and the painting style of the printed art as best I could to preserve the original look as much as possible.

Based on the animal (or fish) on each one, I chose a related Chinese folktale or mythology to illustrate. I also chose one element to outline to make it stand out. I watched a lot of cartoons growing up and always found the juxtaposition of a painted background with a flat, outlined animation cel set a particular tone about what merited attention.

Here they are in the window display at Kaleid Gallery, from left to right:

The Dragon God
Dragons are symbols of power, strength, and good luck, and have particular control over water.

The Monkey’s Loss
The monkeys abandoned peaches for corn, and then watermelons, and then lost it all in pursuit of a rabbit.

The Farmer’s Fence
The farmer, mourning the loss of a sheep after the fence broke, fails to mend it and later loses more.

The Rabbit In the Moon
The rabbit is a companion of the moon goddess Chang’e, and uses a mortar and pestle to pound the elixir of life.

Ye Xian (the “Chinese Cinderella”)
Ye Xian, a peasant girl, befriends a magical carp who helps her win the hand of the prince.

The Rooster’s Crown
After a skilled archer shot the eight suns, the ninth hid away until the rooster could coax it out.

Linocut: SJ Electric Light Tower

SJ Electric Light Tower

SJ Electric Light Tower

These are linocut prints of the San José Electric Light Tower, a tower that spanned an intersection and provided the first electric lighting west of the Rockies. I carved this into a flexible linoleum block, which I inked by hand and “printed” by pressing it onto paper. Since they/re done one at a time there can be a lot of variation, as shown. Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, and enjoy a little illumination for this winter.

Tumultuous

Tumultuous • 5" x 5"

Tumultuous • 5″ x 5″

I’ve been meaning to do more with watercolor pencils to get a better grasp of how to work with them. I recently used them for the Creepy Ancestors series, and decided to give them another try for this ocean illustration.

Water is very challenging! Some art locks onto the heart of the subject right away, but this stayed pretty elusive. There are sharp contrasts and defined edges, but they’re fleeting. The spray can be settled like a light wash or frothing along the tops of waves. I broke out my masking fluid to preserve the white parts, but it just didn’t give the depth I wanted so I resorted to a few spots of white acrylic at the end. I used three shades of blue, a green, and a touch of Payne’s Gray (watercolor from tubes, not the pencils) too.

I noticed that the watercolor pencils are a little finicky about how to set the color. If I draw with them first and then add water, it lifts up the pigments and dilutes it pretty thoroughly. If I draw on top of wet paper, sometimes it seems to make no mark and other times it drops a strong piece of color. I found the most consistent results in dipping the pencil itself into water and then drawing/painting with that, using extra water to dilute or soften as needed. Sometimes I’d let it all dry and then use the watercolor pencils more like colored pencils so I could get some hard lines. They’re great for traveling – much more convenient than watercolor tubes – so they will definitely get more use.

A Seat At the Bar

A Seat At the Bar • 13.5" x 13.5"

A Seat At the Bar • 12″ x 12″

This new painting is based off a photo I took at the Jack Rose, tucked away off Highway 9 between Los Gatos and Saratoga. The bar is illuminated by yellow lights and creates a very cool effect on the concrete floor, especially with the line of bar stools.

I tried a couple of new things on this one. First: instead of sketching this one by eye, I tried out carbon paper. Much faster! Since these are just guidelines for getting the alignment correct, I’ll probably do more of this in the future. The carbon paper also doesn’t smudge as much as pencil does.

I also tried out a new paint color which created an interesting effect here. After I layered on the basic tones with the yellow ochre, burnt sienna, and burnt umber, I added on a few spots of nickel azo yellow. I thought it would pop out the lighter yellow colors, but instead it added an interesting oxidized-copper looking green to it. It really makes the reddish bits in the burnt sienna pop out. I used it to create more detail in the bar stools since they were slipping away into the shadows.

Ever since painting The Raven I’ve been paying more attention to the contrasts in the dark tones. Here, I used ultramarine only in the areas around the figures to make those a sharper contrast. This contrast helps the rest of the barstools fade away.

Starting sketch

Starting sketch

Yellow ochre

Yellow ochre

Burnt sienna

Burnt sienna

Burnt umber

Burnt umber

Nickel azo yellow

Nickel azo yellow

Ultramarine

Ultramarine

Yellow and white

Yellow and white

Trilogy of Shadow Puppets

These frames reminded me of the soot around a fireplace so I created these three illustrations of shadow puppets. I mostly picked these animals because I thought the hand shapes were interesting. Now that I see them together, I realized they’re all animals in the American wilderness. I imagine them as part of a tale told at a remote cabin in the woods.

Shadow Pupper: Deer • 10" x 12" • ink and charcoal

Shadow Pupper: Deer • 10″ x 12″ • ink and charcoal

Shadow Pupper: Eagle • 12" x 10" • ink and charcoal

Shadow Pupper: Eagle • 12″ x 10″ • ink and charcoal

Shadow Pupper: Wolf • 10" x 12" • ink and charcoal

Shadow Pupper: Wolf • 10″ x 12″ • ink and charcoal